How to Realize Your True Potential [5 Keys]

By Evelio | Personal Development

Being an adult means taking responsibility for everything that happens in your life. Including the bad stuff.

But we often fail because we can’t see ourselves for who we truly are. We fail to see our own true potential.

When we do realize how powerful we are, then we can lead meaningful lives. So keep reading to lead a happier, healthier, more powerful life.

Learn to Say No

While the movie “Yes Man” is hilarious and does bring about positive changes in the life of Jim Carrey’s character, in real life, saying yes too much can be exhausting.

People pleasers struggle to say no. They don’t want to disappoint other people.

Yet, they are constantly disappointing the most important person in their lives, themselves.

Saying no when you don’t have time is okay. Saying no because you just don’t want to is also okay.

It’s time to learn how to respect yourself and your time. You’re just as valuable as everyone else.

Learn From Your Mistakes

Mistakes are just that, “miss”-takes. In other words, you took a wrong turn. That’s okay.

It doesn’t mean you’re a failure. Failure only occurs when you don’t try.

When we learn from our mistakes, we can grow as humans and realize our true potential. Or we can sit in our shame and embarrassment and do nothing.

We all have a choice. We can take a look at what happened and figure out why it didn’t go our way. Or we can blame everyone else and wonder why life doesn’t seem so great.

There is no such thing as perfection. We are humans and we all make mistakes. It’s how we handle and correct our mistakes that sets us apart from others.

 

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Success Never Happens Overnight

You often hear about powerful CEOs or famous people who are celebrated for being overnight success stories. It’s hard not to hear those stories and feel there’s something wrong with you.

But the overnight success story is a myth. What they didn’t share in that article were the months, years, and possibly decades of blood, sweat, and tears that person put into becoming successful.

As Malcolm Gladwell writes in his book, “Outliers,” it takes most people at least 10,000 hours to reach their true potential. That includes such famous people as The Beatles and Bill Gates.

But success is a journey and a process, not an event. It means continuing to get up each and every day intent on making today the best day you possibly can.

It means growing, learning, and not allowing setbacks to stop you.

When we do realize how powerful we are, then we can lead meaningful lives. Click To Tweet

Figure Out Your True Potential By Identifying Your Strengths and Weaknesses

Self-awareness is a key element to figuring out your potential in life. Which means taking a long look at your strengths and weaknesses.

It’s just as important to know what you like doing as it is to know what you don’t like doing.

As for weaknesses, often, they can be turned into strengths. Perhaps listening isn’t a skill you think you possess. Learning to listen well is a skill that can be developed.

Or perhaps you believe your vulnerability is a weakness. Sharing your story with others can help them feel as though they aren’t alone.

Never stop learning about yourself. It will help you become a better person.

The biggest challenge we all face is to learn about ourselves and to understand our strengths and weaknesses. We need to utilize our strengths, but not so much that we don’t work on our weaknesses. — Mae Jemison

Learn From Others

It’s helpful to know you aren’t alone in your journey. Often, hearing other people share their stories helps you learn and grow.

Hearing others speak can offer insightful wisdom and inspire you to become even greater.

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About the Author

Evelio Silvera is a business development and communication professional. Evelio is an best-selling author and acclaimed speaker and speechwriter with numerous national and international awards who has appeared on national radio and television programs and been featured in several publications.

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